Posts tagged Zoology
The House Spider (Tegenaria gigantea)

Spiders are amazing creatures and there are thousands of identified species in the world. In the UK alone, there are over 600 species across 37 families. Many people will commonly refer to spiders as 'insects’. Although spiders, like insects, are invertebrates and belong to the phylum Arthropoda, they do not belong to the same class. Insects are part of the Insecta class, whereas spiders - similarly to scorpions, mites and ticks - belong to the class Arachnida.

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Magizoology and Zoology

According to Pottermore, had I attended Hogwarts, I would have been placed in Ravenclaw. I’m not sure whether the description of the house fully describes me but since I really like Ravens, I’m pretty happy with that assessment. What I do know, is that were this the wizarding world, I would likely have pursued a career in Magizoology.

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TetZooCon 2018

TetZooCon this year was a two-day event that took place at UCL on the 6th and 7th October. Unfortunately, due to health reasons, I was unable to attend the last day - though I did follow it on Twitter using the hashtag #TetZooCon. If you’ve never heard of TetZooCon or Darren Naish’s famous Tetrapod Zoology blog (aka Tet Zoo), you are seriously missing out. TetZooCon is an annual meeting that features talks and workshops on topics explored in the Tet Zoo blog.

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Review: National Geographic - Inside Animal Minds

Having exhausted all my book options over the two-week travel to Ikaria, I stopped by a WH Smith at Athens airport to find something to read (in English) to entertain myself during the flight back to the UK. I immediately spotted Brandon Keim’s National Geographic publication called Inside Animal Minds and knew that I was set for the flight.

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The Red-Footed Tortoise Turning into a Pyramid (Chelonoidis carbonaria)

Out of all reptiles in existence, tortoises are one of the most widely kept as pets. This is not surprising considering that unlike other reptiles, they are perceived as mostly docile and non-threatening to humans. There's also, of course, the cuteness factor. Unfortunately, humans seem to be just as uninformed regarding their needs and husbandry as they are of any other reptilian order.

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