Posts in Animal Welfare
The Common Egg-Eater (Dasypeltis scabra)

Taking a trip down memory lane is always a gamble. We've all had good and bad experiences but I think it's fair to say that both help shape us into who we are today. 

A while ago whilst visiting my mother-in-law, I started to truly appreciate the impressive bookshelf that my husband cultivated as a child. Reading has always been one of his favourite things to do. His bedroom's bookshelf (the one he had as a child) is filled with fantasy books. Next to these books is a picture of his child-self smiling whilst pointing at the spider climbing his naked torso. To this date, he still loves spiders and other critters, which brings me to my biggest find on the bookshelf - a book called 'Amazing Snakes' written by Alexandra Parsons which is part of the 'Amazing Worlds' series published in 1990. As I understand it, this was a birthday present he got alongside the 'Amazing Spiders' book of the same series that was nowhere to be found. 

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The Red-Footed Tortoise Turning into a Pyramid (Chelonoidis carbonaria)

Out of all reptiles in existence, tortoises are one of the most widely kept as pets. This is not surprising considering that unlike other reptiles, they are perceived as mostly docile and non-threatening to humans. There's also, of course, the cuteness factor. Unfortunately, humans seem to be just as uninformed regarding their needs and husbandry as they are of any other reptilian order.

Before I start ranting about 'bad humans', let me give you a brief overview of the Chelonoidis carbonaria, commonly known as Red-footed Tortoise. If like me you too grew up in Brazil, the 'Jabuti-Piranga' as most Brazilians call them, are not exactly rare. Unfortunately, as expected of such a successfully captive kept species, wild populations are decreasing due to loss of habitat and the capture of wild individuals to meet the demands of the exotic pet trade.

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Review: Bio-Activity and the Theory of Wild Re-Creation by John Courtney-Smith from Arcadia Reptile

Most responsible reptile and amphibians keepers - especially those who do not study herpetology - will rely on books and the internet for information on how to provide the best care they can possibly provide to their herptile. However, finding accurate information and advice based on research and not opinions can be a pretty difficult task at times.

There are a number of reptile and amphibian husbandry guides out there, and let me tell you - being someone who has bought and read quite a few of those, the discrepancies and inaccuracies in some of them are very scary. For that reason, despite studying herpetology, when it comes to the care of these animals in captivity I will often refer to a reputable exotics specialist vet.

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